Tag Archives: Digital Evolution

BEACON Researchers at Work: The evolution of sociality in a large cat

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU graduate student Eli Strauss. Of the 37 extant species of cats, lions (Panthera leo) are the only species in which females live gregariously in groups (Caro 1989, Packer 1986). … Continue reading

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Creating Life and Worlds: Solving Evolutionary Problems in the Digital World

This blog post was written by students in BEACON’s Fall 2013 Computational Science for Evolutionary Biologists course, taught by MSU faculty Titus Brown and graduate student Randy Olson. Blog post lead author: S. Kevin McCormick, with contributions from Zach Laubach, Nicolas Schmelling, Josephine … Continue reading

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Evolution 101: Digital Evolution

This Evolution 101 post is by MSU graduate student Armand Burks. When scientists study the process of evolution in living organisms, two of the key limiting factors are that of time and the amount of data available. In practice, it … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: Evolving Virtual Creatures

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work post is by University of Texas graduate student Dan Lessin and Nicole Lessin. As an undergraduate in the 1990s, I was studying studio art, animation, and computer graphics at Harvard when I first came … Continue reading

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What’s in a (mutation’s) name?

Cross-posted from UT postdoc Art Covert’s blog, Covert Science(ish) Names are generally very arbitrary things. In the words of The Bard: “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” This may be true for roses, but for mutations, … Continue reading

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