Tag Archives: Cooperation

Studying the Evolution of Division of Labor with Digital Organisms

This post is by MSU Postdoc Heather Goldsby. Why do you have different types of cells in your body? Why do honeybees perform different roles, including forager, undertaker, nurse, and queen? Why do factory workers perform jobs as specific as … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: The Evolution of Cooperation by the Hankshaw Effect: A Big Thumbs Up for Cooperation!

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by University of Washington graduate students Katie Dickinson and Sarah Hammarlund and postdoc Brian Connelly. Hold your hand out in front of you and examine it closely. Five digits, four fingers … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: Partnerships between plants and bacteria

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU graduate student Colleen Friel. My foray into the world of science started back when I was a high school student dead set on becoming a large animal veterinarian. To … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: The Social Lives of Bacteria

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU faculty member Chris Waters. “Nature red in tooth and claw”-Lord Alfred Tennyson Tennyson’s famous phrase eloquently describes the adversarial nature (pun intended) that arises from Darwin’s concepts of natural … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: Peering into the Cooperative Brain

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by University of Texas at Austin graduate student Chelsea Weitekamp. An unlucky vampire bat returning to roost at night with an empty belly can solicit help from a roost-mate to avoid … Continue reading

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