Tag Archives: Biological Evolution

BEACON Researchers at Work: Providing computational methods for biological research

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by University of Texas at Austin research scientist Dennis Wylie. I’ve always been intrigued by the combination of seemingly incongruous things. As a child I loved stories about strange chimerical creatures … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: Partnerships between plants and bacteria

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU graduate student Colleen Friel. My foray into the world of science started back when I was a high school student dead set on becoming a large animal veterinarian. To … Continue reading

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Natural Rejection: Addressing Student Resistance to Evolution Education

Reposted from the Teaching Evolution in Action blog By Ian Zaback It’s a moment that we’ve all dreaded in one way or another. A student approaches you at the end of class clutching a note, and as the paper changes … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: Carnivore Skull Evolution

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU graduate student Nikki Cavalieri. Why? Why do tree frogs stick to glass but toads don’t? Why are baby skinks tail’s blue but adult’s not? Why are puppies and kittens … Continue reading

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BEACON Researchers at Work: The Age of Phage

This week’s BEACON Researchers at Work blog post is by MSU faculty member Kristin Parent, with John Dover.  This year marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of viruses that infect bacteria—the bacteriophages. One may think (as many do) that … Continue reading

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