Category Archives: BEACON Researchers at Work

Evolving antimutator microbial machines

This post is by University of Texas at Austin grad student Dacia Leon (Twitter: @leondacia) Fluorescence microplate readers are really exciting. These instruments are a staple in any synthetic biology lab given that they allow for high-throughput quantification of microbial growth and fluorescence … Continue reading

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Evolving Deep Neural Networks

This post is by UT Austin grad student Jason Liang Deep learning has revolutionized the field of machine learning in many ways. From achieving state-of-the-art results in many benchmarks and competitions to effectively exploiting the computational power of the cloud, … Continue reading

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Mass Extinctions, Evolution, and…. Robots?

Check out this great video produced by the UT Alumni Association talking about research by BEACONites Joel Lehman and Risto Miikkulainen at UT Austin. Lehman and Miikkulainen published an awesome paper in PLOS ONE looking at evolution after a mass extinction.  I, for one, … Continue reading

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A microbe-dependent world: studying the legume-rhizobia symbiosis for a more sustainable future

This post is by MSU grad student Shawna Rowe Living in a world full of fascinating visual elements and intriguing macro-organisms often results in people forgetting the most abundant group of earth’s inhabitants— microbes. Microbes are not only the most … Continue reading

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Male battles split species apart

This post is by MSU postdoc Jason Keagy How do species form? Stated more precisely, how does one species become two? This turns out to be an immensely difficult question to answer, because 1) species are not always distinct entities (species … Continue reading

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